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Man suspected of trying to run over Bismarck police officer found in South Dakota

Here's what you should know about the new ND laws taking effect in 2018

Smoke rises from the North Dakota Capitol and chimneys of nearly every building and home Wednesday, Dec. 27. Tom Stromme / Bismarck Tribune

BISMARCK—Although the 2017 North Dakota legislative session ended months ago, several new laws are scheduled to take effect Monday, Jan. 1.

Presumptive probation

A section of House Bill 1041 made probation the presumptive sentence for Class C felony and Class A misdemeanor offenses. The law makes exceptions for certain crimes, such as domestic violence offenses, and it allows a court to impose a prison sentence if there are "aggravating factors."

Campaign finance changes

A bill that a proponent said would improve the transparency of North Dakota elections will go into effect as the 2018 election inches near. Senate Bill 2343 prohibits the personal use of campaign contributions and requires the reporting of campaign expenses.

Child care license applications

Those seeking to renew a child care license will be required to submit the application and fees between 60 and 90 days before their current license expires. A North Dakota lawmaker cited the 2015 drowning of a 5-year-old girl in Velva, N.D., who was under the care of a child care center that had an expired license at the time. If the fees and application are submitted late, the fees double under a provision of Senate Bill 2090.

Training required for city auditors

Senate Bill 2148 requires city auditors to complete training "based on a curriculum specific to that office" within one year of taking office. Auditors are already required by state law to maintain a complete financial record of their city and keep records of city meetings, among other duties.

John Hageman

John Hageman covers North Dakota politics from the Forum News Service bureau in Bismarck. He attended the University of Minnesota in the Twin Cities, where he studied journalism and political science, and he previously worked at the Grand Forks Herald and Bemidji Pioneer.  

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