FARGO — David Crosby wants you to know that he’s doing well.

“I’m a happy guy, man,” he said over the phone a few weeks ago. “I’m at home. That’s one of the reasons I’m a happy guy.”

Crosby is now on the road and pulling into the Fargo Theatre on Sunday, Aug. 25, where he’ll play a show with The Sky Trails Band — but he’s just as happy to be making music as he is to be at home.

While best-known as a founding member of The Byrds and Crosby, Stills & Nash and Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young, the singer-guitarist finds himself in one of the most prolific periods of writing and recording in his life. Since the beginning of 2014, he has released four solo albums, and another one is on the way.

David Crosby (center) and The Sky trails Band plays the Fargo Theatre on May 25. Special to The Forum
David Crosby (center) and The Sky trails Band plays the Fargo Theatre on May 25. Special to The Forum

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Since his solo debut in 1971, “If I Could Only Remember My Name,” he had only released two solo studio efforts leading up to 2014’s “Croz.”

“I don’t know what it is in me. I’m feeling pretty good,” he says about his recent productivity. “I’m also working with unbelievably talented people.”

He’s been playing for the last few years with his son, James Raymond, on keys, and Crosby says his son is the better musician.

Crosby and fellow singer-guitarist Jason Isbell are also talking about writing new material.

Fans of his classic work will be happy to hear renditions of some of the songs that got him inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, with both The Byrds and CSNY. Still, don’t expect to hear note-for-note reproductions from the original albums.

David Crosby, center, played the St. Paul Civic Center in 1977 with Stephen Stills and Graham Nash. Tom Sweeney / Minneapolis Star Tribune / TNS
David Crosby, center, played the St. Paul Civic Center in 1977 with Stephen Stills and Graham Nash. Tom Sweeney / Minneapolis Star Tribune / TNS

“We change everything all the time. We’re always rearranging, always rethinking,” he says. “That’s one of my most favorite things. I love complex chord structures and beautiful melodies. I’m definitely influenced by jazz because it’s beautiful music.”

Beautiful music, for sure, but some of it came from turbulent times, and his tenures with The Byrds and CSNY ended acrimoniously.

“You know, I don’t go back hardly at all,” he said when asked if he thinks about the old times when performing classic tunes like “Eight Miles High” or “Long Time Gone.”

“I think of the songs," he adds. "I don’t really think of the context they came out of. My focus is almost entirely forward. I’m thinking about what I’ve got to do next week and what I’d like to do next year. That’s really where my head is.”

He doesn’t need to think about the past because others keep bringing it up for him. You can’t read a profile about him without details of band breakups, troubled personal relationships, his battles with drug addictions and his health problems.

Cover of the 1969 debut "Crosby, Stills & Nash" album. Special to The Forum
Cover of the 1969 debut "Crosby, Stills & Nash" album. Special to The Forum

Much of those topics were covered in a new rockumentary, “Remember My Name,” by director A.J. Eaton and co-produced by Cameron Crowe, who also acts as interviewer. The film opened Friday at the Fargo Theatre.

“He gets stuff out of me nobody else gets out of me,” Crosby says of Crowe, who he has known since the filmmaker was a 16-year-old rock journalist. “Cameron’s the best interviewer I’ve ever run into. It went a lot deeper than we thought it was going to.”

So deep that he says there were some scenes he wish had been left on the cutting room floor.

“Probably a couple of scenes but I didn’t have final cut,” Crosby says. “They did what they thought would make the most effective film, that would make you feel stuff the most. I have to say, I really agree with their choices. I think they did a great job.”

The movie is a warts-and-all look at his life and is unflinching in pointing out that his outspokenness has damaged some of his closest relationships. His former bandmates in CSNY say they will never play with him again.

From left, Neil Young, David Crosby, Stephen Stills and Tim Drummond during a 1974 Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young concert in Texas. Handout courtesy of Joel Bernstein / Sony Pictures Classics
From left, Neil Young, David Crosby, Stephen Stills and Tim Drummond during a 1974 Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young concert in Texas. Handout courtesy of Joel Bernstein / Sony Pictures Classics

He says there is an element of him trying to make amends, but mostly he’s trying to get right with himself.

“That’s part of it,” he says. “I’m trying to clear my deck and trying to get a clear picture of myself and make it be the way it should be. I’m happy about it.”

Still, he hasn’t heard from any of those he’s offended after seeing the movie.

“I didn’t really do it for that, man,” he says. “I did it because it felt good and I don’t know how it’s going to work for anybody else. I’m not worried about that.”

He’s not the only one who has liked the movie. Critics have appreciated the frankness in which he talks about his own shortcomings as well as his openness facing mortality. A National Public Radio review stated, “Crosby often seems to be writing his own self-lacerating obituary.”

In the movie, he acknowledges his fear of death, noting that at his age — he just turned 78 — and given how he’s treated his body, his time is limited.

Still, he sidesteps questions of how much he thinks about his mortality in our interview.

“Some, but not much. I can’t do much about it,” he says. “I’m very happy with my life right now and that’s the main thing.”

When his time comes, he hopes that he’s remembered more for what he did in the studio and on the stage than for what has made him a punchline for late night talk show hosts.

“I want them to remember the art,” he says. “That’s the best contribution I’ve made. That’s what I want most for them to remember.”

If you go

What: David Crosby

When: 8 p.m. Sunday, Aug. 25

Where: Fargo Theatre, 314 Broadway N.

Info: Tickets are $74.50, not including fees; www.jadepresents.com or 866-300-8300