DETROIT LAKES, Minn. — The Meadows on Lind is a serene wedding venue is full of lush, green grass, rolling hills and a few rustic, farm-inspired touches. Today, it also has myotonic "fainting" goats.

Gingersnap is a young female, colored like the cookie itself, while her pal Ziggy Marley is a spunky black and white male — less gingersnap, more Oreo. Both are adorable and ready to do a job only they can do: serve as the guests of honor at the first-ever goat yoga class to be held at The Meadows.

Fun trend

"We're an online and traveling yoga studio," explains Brianna Krejci of Cabin Fever Yoga about how this all came about. "We have teamed up with the Meadows on Lind and Sugar Bush Goat Ranch (in Detroit Lakes), where these babies come from."

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Brianna Krejci of Cabin Fever Yoga stretches while Ziggy Marley stands by. Jack Davis / Meadows on Lind / Special to The Forum
Brianna Krejci of Cabin Fever Yoga stretches while Ziggy Marley stands by. Jack Davis / Meadows on Lind / Special to The Forum

Krejci says they're excited to take part in the goat yoga trend that started a few years ago on the East Coast. By all accounts, would-be goat yoga enthusiasts around here are excited to try it.

"Within the first 24 to 48 hours, we sold out our first class and had to add a second — and that sold out within 24 hours, too," she says.

More classes are planned. Why is it so popular?

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"Anything can happen really," says Krejci. "It's such a delightful thing to do. People love yoga. People loving coming together and moving and breathing together. But then if we take ourselves too seriously, you can't do that when a goat is sharing his or her opinion in your face."

So what was it like?

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I found it delightful, just like Krejci said it would be.

Unlike some videos I've seen from other goat yoga classes, the goats were not climbing all over us — most of the time. Gingersnap, whose mother was recently stolen from the ranch, seemed particularly close to ranch manager and handler Jim Brogren. But with gentle nudging, both she and Ziggy warmed up to us and walked around as we did poses.

As a class, we were invited to pick up and hold the goats. We were all mindful of not stressing out the kids, but Brogren assured us Gingersnap and Ziggy were just fine. He says if they weren't, we'd know it.

"They're myotonic fainting goats, so when they're scared, they faint," he said.

No one fainted, so all was good.

Brianna Krejci of Cabin Fever Yoga looks on as Gingersnap jumps on Tracy Briggs during goat yoga at Meadows on Lind in Detroit Lakes, Minn. Jack Davis / Meadows on Lind / Special to The Forum
Brianna Krejci of Cabin Fever Yoga looks on as Gingersnap jumps on Tracy Briggs during goat yoga at Meadows on Lind in Detroit Lakes, Minn. Jack Davis / Meadows on Lind / Special to The Forum

In fact, our class found it more relaxing than regular yoga. We were outdoors on a coolish summer day. I forgot to bring a yoga mat, so I performed the poses in the dewy grass. As I closed my eyes, I enjoyed the peace and fresh air.

When Gingersnap started sniffing around me and even jumped on me briefly, it was hard not to laugh. Even when she and Ziggy drifted away — they might have gotten bored with us — they continued to be very vocal. Their bleating sounded almost like a giggle. How can you be stressed out in the midst of all of that?

For more information about goat yoga, including class times and dates, find Cabin Fever Yoga, Meadows on Lind and Sugar Bush Goat Ranch on Facebook or look up their websites.